Thursday, November 3, 2011

Litebox Deal Raises Daniels Dander


Mary Beth Schneider penned a blog post with some really interesting comments from Governor Mitch Daniels on the Litebox deal announced a few days ago at a news conference. Essentially, it sounds like Mitch the Knife is cutting this one to the bone.

If you read between the lines of the Schneider piece, it sure sounds like the Governor was defensive as he told her and the reporters present that the city and state risk very little if the deal doesn't go through. He also said that it was "their problem" if investors put money into the project based on Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard and him standing with Bob Yangihara, the Litebox company owner.

I don't think Daniels gets it. It's not about what the city or state is risking. It's the idea that we are counting job commitments as jobs created. It's simply not a good way to account economic progress...whatever the paradigm is that was inherited.

Matt Tully also wrote this column wondering if Ballard's misstep on Litebox might ultimately help put some meat onto Melina Kennedy's recent and campaign commercials criticizing the Mayor's job creation vs. job commitments over the last four years. He likens Ballard's performance to that of a sports star fumbling a chance to win the game in the fourth quarter. These types of things could be contributing to the 21 percent rating of undecided voters in the recent WISH-TV poll.

Privately, I think Daniels is probably embarrassed that he has to answer these questions. I don't have any facts to back that up, but I bet he's at least not pleased that he was trotted out on this occasion for what was probably another hastily-conceived Ballard campaign ploy.

4 comments:

Paul K. Ogden said...

"Privately, I think Daniels is probably embarrassed that he has to answer these questions. I don't have any facts to back that up, but I bet he's at least not pleased that he was trotted out on this occasion for what was probably another hastily-conceived Ballard campaign ploy."

I have no doubt that's true.

marksmall2001 said...

Counting potential jobs created as actually created reminds me of Enron's accounting practices. In their pump-and-dump books-cooking, they would report as an actual profit projected earnings. They were up-front (if you looked at footnotes and such) so people could see (if they bothered to look, a job stock investment analysts are supposed to perform) that the figures were projections. But people invested in Enron and for a lot of quarters Enron shares increased in value. Each quarter the Enron guys who had received (not earned unless you consier someone who has artfully defrauded as having "earned" the money obtained by the fraud) would sell the shares that had increased in value thanks to the reports of their cooked books. This is a different form of the same fraud. A politician or group of politicians claims jobs actually created when they are illusory. Unfortunately, few of the Enron boys were prosecuted. I this instance, if no public monies changed hands, I don't know of a statute under which there could be a prosecution. The only remedy is to vote the bums out who tried it.

varangianguard said...

So, I checked the dictionary (as per the Governor's "polite" suggestion. What did I find?

Not quite what he was describing.

"Given to or characterized by fanciful, not presently workable, or unpractical ideas, views, or schemes."

Not presently workable. So, either the Governor knew it was smoke and mirrors, or that maybe the Governor should have checked his own dictionary first?

Anonymous said...

Mitch is just showing his quick temper, bitterness, and thin skin.

This is nothing new.

He must find it difficult to always be the smartest one in the room surrounded by inferior people who challenge his superior intellect and judgement;)